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Winter Heating TIPs

   

STATE FIRE MARSHAL PROVIDES

WINTER HEATING SAFETY TIPS

 

          STATEWIDE (January 6, 2014) As the temperatures drop to extreme lows, we depend on multiple types of heating sources to stay warm inside our homes.  State Fire Marshal Brian S. Geraci is providing Marylanders life and home saving heating safety tips.  “Elements of heating resources continue to be a significant factor in home fires in Maryland,” according to the Fire Marshal.  “Following these guidelines, we can work together to reduce the number of residential fires.”

 

·         Ensure chimneys are cleaned annually or more frequently if used as the primary heating equipment.

·         Use properly sized fireplace screens or enclosures.  Never use a flammable liquid to start a fire.

·         When disposing of cooled ashes, do not use paper or plastic containers to remove them, instead use a metal container.  Ashes will insulate hot embers long after the fire is considered out.

·         Make sure fuel burning stoves are installed according to local fire codes and manufacturer’s instructions.

·         Have your furnace inspected and serviced annually.

·         Check portable electric heaters for frayed/damaged wires and ensure they are clean and placed on a flat level surface.  Use only “listed” appliances by an approved testing laboratory and follow manufacturer’s instructions.

·         Do not use extension cords with portable space heaters.  The extension cord can overheat and cause a fire.

·         If you use kerosene fuel fired heaters, use only “K-1” kerosene fuel.  Never fill the unit inside, remove it to the exterior after it has cooled before refueling.  Note: Portable kerosene heaters are banned for use in Baltimore City.

·         Open a window enough to provide proper ventilation.

·         Keep combustibles (furniture, curtains, clothing, paper goods, etc.), at least (3) three feet from all heat sources.

·         Fuel burning appliances can produce the deadly, tasteless and odorless gas known as carbon monoxide.  Install and maintain carbon monoxide alarms inside your home to provide an early warning of carbon monoxide levels.

·         Always turn off portable heating equipment when leaving the room for extended periods.  Portable heaters should never be operated unattended.

 

Along with these heating tips, check to make sure your smoke alarms are in good working order.  “Routine maintenance and safe operation of heating equipment, combined with properly installed and operating smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors, are a life-saving combination for all Marylanders,” stated Geraci.

 

Posted on 07 Jan 2014
HOME FIRE SAFETY

HOME FIRE SAFETY

Fireplace Safety

 BEFORE YOU LIGHT IT...............Chimneys, fireplaces, and vents should be inspected at least once a year. Inspection should include: soundness, deterioration, freedom from deposits and animal nests.  Cleaning, maintenance, and repairs must be done if necessary.

Don't put your family or home in jeopardy.


Posted on 25 Oct 2010
Smoke Detectors/Alarms

  "IS IT TIME TO CHANGE THE BATTERIES"

HAVE A PLAN....

Smoke Detectors/Alarms

“Change Your Clock Change Your Battery”


1)      Every year, approximately 2,600 Americans die in home fires.  Over half of these deaths (52%) occur between the hours of 10:00pm and 7:00am, when residents are typically sleeping. Smoke and toxic gases from a home fire are as deadly as heat and flames.  Just two or three breaths of toxic smoke can render you unconscious.  The majority of fire victims die or are injured from exposure to smoke and toxic gases, such as carbon monoxide, not actual burns.  In addition, smoke obscures vision, decreasing your ability to escape.


2)      Smoke alarms save lives, prevent injuries, and minimize property damage by detecting fires early and alerting residents, allowing crucial time to escape.  The risk of dying from a fire in a home without working smoke alarms is twice as high as in a home that has working smoke alarms.


3)       Carbon monoxide (CO) detectors in homes recognize unsafe carbon monoxide levels.        Along with a smoke detector they double a family’s chance of surviving a home fire and/or unsafe atmosphere. “Please take the little time required to help ensure the safety of your family and friends by maintaining these early warning life saving devices.” “Change Your Clock Change Your Battery”


CALL YOUR LOCAL FIRE DEPARTMENT

AND FIND OUT HOW TO MAKE YOUR HOME SAFER


Posted on 02 Mar 2011
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Incident Statistics

2016 FIRE EMS
JAN 40 65
FEB    
MAR    
APR    
MAY    
JUN    
JUL    
AUG    
SEP    
OCT    
NOV    
DEC    
TOTAL 40 65

 

Year 2015

Fire - 407

EMS - 711

 

Year 2014

Fire - 384

EMS - 604

 

Year 2013

Fire - 322

EMS - 543

 

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Fire - 338

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Year 2011

Fire - 348

EMS - 541

 

Year 2010

Fire - 348

EMS - 557

 

Year 2009

Fire - 330

EMS - 585

 

Year 2008

Fire - 345

EMS - 523 

 

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