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Thanksgiving Safety

HAPPY THANKSGIVING

ENJOY YOUR THANKSGIVING

AND STAY SAFE

TIPS - TO BE PREPARED, TO BE SAFE

􀀹 Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you must leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.

􀀹 If you are simmering, baking, boiling, or roasting food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that the stove or oven is on.

􀀹 Avoid wearing loose clothing or dangling sleeves while cooking.

􀀹 Keep kids away from cooking areas by enforcing a "kid-free zone" of three feet around the stove.

􀀹 Keep anything that can catch on fire—pot holders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, and towels or curtains—away from your stove top and oven or any other appliance in the kitchen that generates heat.

􀀹 Smoke alarms save lives. Install a smoke alarm near your kitchen and use the test button to check it each month. Replace all batteries at least once a year.

􀀹 After your Thanksgiving guests leave, ask a family member to perform a home safety check to ensure that all candles and smoking materials are extinguished.

􀀹 If you must use a turkey fryer, make sure it is outdoors and in an open area away from all walls, fences or other structures that could catch on fire and away from moisture that can cause serious burns from steam or splattering hot oil. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions.


Add a photo for Deep Fried TurkeyFollow the Turkey Fryer Safety TIPS:         


 

Hot oil may splash or spill during the cooking.

  • Contact between hot oil and skin could result in serious injury.

  • A hot oil spill can happen with fryers designed for outdoor use using a stand. The fryer could tip over or collapse causing the hot oil to spill. Newer countertop units using a solid base appear to reduce this risk. NFPA does not believe the risks of either type of turkey fryer to be acceptable because of the large amount of hot oil involved and the speed and severity of burns.

  • In deep frying, oil is heated to temperatures of 350° Fahrenheit or more. Cooking oil is combustible. If it is heated above its cooking temperature, its vapors can ignite.

  • Propane-fired turkey fryers must be used outdoors. They are very popular for Thanksgiving. Many parts of the country may have rain or snow at this time of year. If rain or snow hits the hot cooking oil, the oil may splatter or turn to steam, leading to burns.

  • Turkeys must be completely thawed before placing in the fryer, because a partially thawed turkey will cause the oil to splatter causing serious burns.

  • The fryers use a lot of oil, about five gallons. Considering the size and weight of the turkey, extreme caution must be taken when placing and removing the turkey from the fryer to be sure it is not dropped back into the fryer, splattering the oil on the chef.

Sources: American Red Cross,* U.S. Fire Administration,** and the National Fire Protection Association.***


Posted on 20 Nov 2014
Congratulations


The Pleasant Valley Community Fire Company

     CONGRATULATES

President Stephen Wantz
Carroll County Commissioner Elect - District 1


Posted on 05 Nov 2014
Severe Storm Preparedness

 

…………………… SEVERE STORMS…………………

KEEP AWARE>>>

IN CARROLL COUNTY

<<<BE PREPARED

 

Office of Public Safety Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/CCOPSSS

Carroll County Government Website: http://ccgovernment.carr.org/ccg/default.asp

Carroll County Government Twitter: @CarrollCoMD

Carroll County Access Channel 24

 

The following are things you can do to protect yourself, your family and your property before severe weather:

 Build an Emergency Supply Kit, which includes items like non-perishable food, water, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra flashlights and batteries. You may want to prepare a portable kit and keep it in your car in case you are told to evacuate. This kit should also include a pair of goggles and disposable breathing masks for each member of the family.

 Make a Family Emergency Plan. Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another, how you will get back together and what you will do in case of an emergency.

 Continually monitor the media – Be aware of storm's which could impact your area.

 •Know how you will be warned in an emergency (NOAA Weather radios with a tone alert are a good option).

 •Know if you live or work in a flood prone area. Check with your local emergency management for details.

 Know where to shelter (ie: basement, interior room/hall, bathroom, closet, etc) if conditions warrant and where shelters in your area are located.

 •Ensure your home is ready – Elevate items in the basement which could be flooded. Bring in outdoors items such as children's toys, patio furniture, garbage cans, etc which could be blown around and damaged. Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage.

 •Know how to shut off utilities, including power, water and gas, to your home. Have proper tools (i.e.: wrench) ready and nearby.

 •Find out what types of events and kinds of damages are covered by your insurance policy. Keep insurance policies, important documents and other valuables in a safe and secure location.

 Keep fire extinguishers on hand and make sure everyone knows how to use them.

Posted on 26 Oct 2012
Smoke Detectors/Alarms

  "IS IT TIME TO CHANGE THE BATTERIES"

HAVE A PLAN....

Smoke Detectors/Alarms

Smoke Detectors/Alarms

1)      Every year, approximately 2,600 Americans die in home fires.  Over half of these deaths (52%) occur between the hours of 10:00pm and 7:00am, when residents are typically sleeping. Smoke and toxic gases from a home fire are as deadly as heat and flames.  Just two or three breaths of toxic smoke can render you unconscious.  The majority of fire victims die or are injured from exposure to smoke and toxic gases, such as carbon monoxide, not actual burns.  In addition, smoke obscures vision, decreasing your ability to escape.

2)      Smoke alarms save lives, prevent injuries, and minimize property damage by detecting fires early and alerting residents, allowing crucial time to escape.  The risk of dying from a fire in a home without working smoke alarms is twice as high as in a home that has working smoke alarms.

 

CALL YOUR  LOCAL FIRE DEPARTMENT AND FIND OUT HOW TO MAKE YOUR HOME  SAFER

 

Posted on 02 Mar 2011
HOME FIRE SAFETY

HOME FIRE SAFETY

Fireplace Safety

 BEFORE YOU LIGHT IT...............Chimneys, fireplaces, and vents should be inspected at least once a year. Inspection should include: soundness, deterioration, freedom from deposits and animal nests.  Cleaning, maintenance, and repairs must be done if necessary.

Don't put your family or home in jeopardy.


Posted on 25 Oct 2010
Content Management Powered by CuteNews

 

Incident Statistics

2014 FIRE EMS
JAN 34 62
FEB 48 47
MAR 50 54
APR 42 44
MAY 29 56
JUN 32 56
JUL 22 47
AUG 24 52
SEP 23 42
OCT 23 52
NOV    
DEC    
TOTAL 327 512

 

Year 2013

Fire - 322

EMS - 543

 

Year 2012

Fire - 338

EMS - 610

 

Year 2011

Fire - 348

EMS - 541

 

Year 2010

Fire - 348

EMS - 557

 

Year 2009

Fire - 330

EMS - 585

 

Year 2008

Fire - 345
EMS - 523 

 

Congratulations

CCVESA

2014-2015

1st VICE PRESIDENT

Charles Simpson

 

 

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the many supporters.

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